Updated Football Recruiting Model Ed. Column

The NCAA recently published an updated educational column regarding adopted proposal 2016-116, which brought about significant change to the football recruiting model. Below you will find the updated educational column, with significant updates highlighted in blue.

Educational Column

NCAA Division I Proposal No. 2016-116 Institutional and Noninstitutional Camp and Clinic Employment — Football Recruiting Model (I)

 I
 August 22, 2017
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During its April 2017 meeting, the NCAA Division I Council adopted an NCAA Division I Proposal (2016-116) outlining a comprehensive football recruiting model.  The model was recommended by the NCAA Division I Football Oversight Committee.  The questions and answers included within this educational column are intended to assist the membership in its understanding of NCAA Division I Proposal No. 2016-116 (athletics personnel and recruiting — football recruiting model) specifically, issues related to institutional and noninstitutional camp and clinic employment.

Question No. 1:  Is there a restriction on the permissible locations for conducting institutional football camps and clinics?

Answer:  An institutional football camp or clinic must be held on the institution’s campus or in the facilities primarily used by the institution for practice or competition.

Question No. 2:  What are the permissible time periods for conducting institutional football camps and clinics?

Answer:

The following changes apply to Football Bowl Subdivision institutions:

  1. Institutional football camps and clinics are limited to a total of 10 days in the months of June and July or any calendar week (Sunday through Saturday) that includes days of those months, which must be on file with the institutions director of athletics; and
  2. The designated 10 days are not required to be consecutive.

The following changes apply to NCAA Football Championship Subdivision institutions:

  • Institutional football camps and clinics are limited to the months of June and July or any calendar week (Sunday through Saturday) that includes days of those months.

Question No. 3:  How may institutional coaching staff members may be employed at institutional/noninstitutional football camps and clinics?

Answer:  Institutional coaching staff members may be employed at his/her own institution’s football camp or clinic.  Further, institutional coaches who are permissible off-campus recruiters and graduate assistant coaches who have passed the coaches certification exam, may be employed at other NCAA four-year institutions’ football camps and clinics.  Finally, institutional coaches are not permitted to be employed at any noninstitutional, privately owned camp or clinic that is not an institutional football camp or clinic for an NCAA four-year institution.

Question No. 4:  May institutional noncoaching staff members be employed at institutional/noninstitutional football camps and clinics?

Answer:  Institutional noncoaching staff members may only be employed at his/her own institution’s football camp or clinic.

Question No. 5:  Is an institution permitted to provide a junior prospective student-athlete expenses (e.g., transportation, camp registration fee, etc.) for an institutional football camp or clinic occurring during the prospect’s official visit to the institution?

Answer:  No.  A prospective student-athlete may not participate in an institutional football camp or clinic in conjunction with an official visit.

Question No. 6:  Who is permitted to have recruiting conversations with prospective student-athletes at camps or clinics?

Answer:  Any institution’s head or assistant coaches employed at an institution’s football camp or clinic and any institution’s graduate assistant coaches who have passed the coaches certification exam and are employed at an institution’s football camp or clinic can have recruiting conversations with prospective student-athletes participating in the camp or clinic.

Question No. 7:  May institutional staff members have recruiting conversations with parents of prospects who are participating in an intuition’s football camp or clinic?

Answer:  In football, recruiting conversations at other institutions’ football camps or clinics may only occur with prospective student-athletes participating in the camp or clinic.  Recruiting conversations with parents, legal guardians or any other individuals accompanying the prospective student-athlete to the camp or clinic is not permissible.  Finally, institutions should note, institutional staff members may have recruiting conversations with such individuals at their own institutional football camp or clinic, occurring on the staff member’s campus, provided contact does not occur during a legislated recruiting dead period.

Question No. 8: Is it permissible to create a special addition at an institutional football camp or clinic solely for recruiting purposes?

Answer: No. Recruiting conversations during a camp or clinic may only occur in normal institutional facilities and areas utilized for camp or clinic purposes. Special additions or alterations may not be made to such facilities and areas for a recruiting purpose.

Question No. 9:  Do institutional football camps and clinics still need to have an instructional component?

Answer:  Yes, an instructional component is required for institutional football camps and clinics.

Question No. 10:  Do institutional football camps or clinics need to have an educational component?

Answer:  Yes.  All institutional football camps or clinics must provide an educational session during the camp or clinic in which campers are made aware of NCAA rules and regulations
(i.e., initial eligibility, amateurism, etc.).  This educational session must take place during the institutional football camp or clinic.

Question No. 11:  May an FBS or FCS institution’s coach work an NCAA Division II or III institution’s football camp or clinic?

Answer:  Yes, provided the Division II or Division III camp or clinic is operated in accordance with Division I camps and clinics legislation.  This includes, but is not limited to the following:

  1. The camp or clinic provides instruction to participating prospective student-athletes and is not dedicated exclusively to competition;
  2. The camp or clinic does not involve tryout activities (e.g., physical testing without related instruction);
  3. The camp or clinic is held on the Division II or Division III institutions’ campus or facility normally used by the institution for practice or competition;
  4. The camp or clinic is open to any and all entrants (limited only by number, age, grade level and/or gender) and does not provide free or reduced admission or employment to athletics award winners;
  5. The camp or clinic is conducted in June [or any calendar week (Sunday through Saturday) that includes days in June (e.g., May 28-June 3)] and July and does not occur during a Division I football recruiting dead period;
  6. In football bowl subdivision, participation in the camp or clinic is counted within the participating Division I institution’s designated 10 days;
  7. The camp or clinic includes an educational session presented in-person or in a video format detailing NCAA compliance related issues; and
  8. The camp or clinic is not established, sponsored or conducted by an individual or organization that provides recruiting or scouting services concerning prospective student-athletes.

Question No. 12: May an institution’s coach work at a Division II and Division III institution’s camps or clinic if the camps or clinics employ IAWPs or IAWRPs?

Answer: Yes, provided Division I institution does not directly or indirectly arrange the employment of the IAWP or IAWRP.  Such arrangement would constitute operation of the camp or clinic.

Camp Employment of Individuals Associated with a Recruited Prospective Student-Athlete.

Question No. 13:  What is the definition of a recruited prospective student-athlete?

Answer:  In football, for purposes applying individual associated with a recruited prospective student-athlete legislation, a prospective student-athlete triggers recruited status when the institution:

  1. Solicits the prospective student-athlete’s attendance at any institutional camp or clinic;
  2. Provides the prospective student-athlete an official visit;
  3. Provides any recruiting materials to the prospective student-athlete;
  4. Participates in any recruiting contact [including in-person or electronic contact (e.g., telephone calls, video conference, electronic correspondence)] with the prospective student-athlete (including contact initiated by the prospective student-athlete);
  5. Arranges in-person, off-campus contact with the prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete’s parents, relatives or legal guardians;
  6. Initiates or arranges telephone contact with the prospective student-athlete’s parents or legal guardians, on more than one occasion, for the purpose of recruitment;
  7. Issues a verbal offer of athletics aid to the prospective student-athlete;
  8. Issues a National Letter of Intent or written offer of athletics aid to the prospective student-athlete; or
  9. Receives a verbal commitment to attend the institution from the prospective student-athlete.

Question No. 14:  Is it a violation if an institution’s coaching staff begins recruiting the specific prospective student-athlete during the camp in which the IAWP is employed?

Answer:  Yes.  In this situation, NCAA coaching staffs should wait until after the camp concludes to begin recruiting the prospective student-athlete.  However, if the institutional coach engages in recruiting conversations with the specific prospective student-athlete while working the camp or clinic as permitted in this proposal, the institution would not be subject to a violation.

Question No. 15:  Is it a violation if an institution employs an IAWRP and the prospective student-athlete is not present at the institutional camp?

Answer:  Yes.

Question No. 16:  How long does an individual retain the status of an IAWRP?

Answer:  An IAWRP retains that status until the specific recruited prospective student-athlete is no longer eligible to represent the institution, until he enrolls at another NCAA institution or until he has been an enrolled student-athlete at the employing institution for a period greater than two years (24 months).

Question No. 17:  Is there a “pre-existing relationship” exception to the prohibition against employment of an IAWRP at a camp or clinic?

Answer:  No.  There is no pre-existing relationship exception to this prohibition.  Regardless of whether an IAWRP has worked camps or clinics in the past, if the individual is associated with a recruited prospective student-athlete, it is not permissible to employ that individual.

Question No. 18:  May individuals associated with a recruited prospective student-athlete who are high school and nonscholastic coaches be employed at institutional team camps?

Answer:  No.  Such a coach may not be employed by the institution at the camp or receive any financial benefit (e.g., free lodging, transportation, etc.) from the institution.

Question No. 19:  May a high school coach, who is an IAWRP, coach his team at an institution’s team camp?

Answer:  Yes, a high school coach may work with his team at an institution’s team football camp or clinic so long as the following conditions are met:

  1. The high school coach registers for the camp or clinic consistent with all other camp participants (e.g., pays the normal registration fee for similar participants);
  2. The high school coach does not participate in or contribute to instructional components of the camp or clinic conducted by employees of the camp (e.g., individual drills);
  3. The high school coach coaches only his or her high school team in competition (e.g., 11v11); and
  4. The high school coach is not employed by the camp nor receives any financial benefit (e.g., free lodging, transportation, etc.).

Question No. 20:  May individuals associated with a recruited prospective student-athlete who are coaches at another four-year NCAA institution be employed at institutional camps?

Answer:  Yes.

Question No. 21:  May a current student-athlete, whose brother is a prospective student-athlete being recruited by the institution, be employed at his institution’s camp?

Answer:  A currently enrolled student-athlete who has a sibling of prospective student-athlete age and who is being recruited by the institution may be employed at his institution’s camp only if all football student-athletes are given the opportunity to work the camp.  If only a limited number of student-athletes are offered employment, and the institution is recruiting the younger brother, then the current student-athlete may not be employed.

Question No. 22:  May a former student-athlete work an institutional football camp if the former student-athlete has a son or brother who is a prospective student-athlete being recruited by the institution?

Answer:  In general, a familial relationship between an individual and a prospective student-athlete does not automatically result in the individual being considered an IAWP.  Therefore, if the former student-athlete does not meet the definition of an IAWP for his or her son or brother, the institution may employ the former student-athlete at the institution’s football camps, provided the employment and/or compensation is not considered an impermissible recruiting inducement.

Question No. 23:  May a former student-athlete work an institutional camp if the former student-athlete is an IAWRP?

Answer:  No.

Question No. 24:  What institutional penalties can result from employing an IAWRP at an institutional camp or clinic?

Answer:  Penalties could result in the suspension of a head football and/or assistant football coach from coaching in postseason football or regular season games.

Question No. 25:  If an institution employs an IAWRP, what impact does the violation have on the prospective student-athlete’s eligibility?

Answer:  In the event of a violation, the institution is required to declare all involved prospective student-athletes ineligible at that institution and provide written notification and explanation to all such prospective student-athletes that the actions of the institution affected their eligibility.

Question No. 26:  May an IAWRP be employed at an institutional camp or coaches’ clinic that does not involve prospect-aged individuals?

Answer:  No.  While the camps and clinics legislation addresses camps and clinics that include prospective student-athletes, IAWRP legislation applies to camps and clinics regardless of whether the camp or clinic involves prospective student-athletes.  Therefore, an institution may not employ an IAWRP at an institutional camp or coaches’ clinic that does not involve prospective student-athletes.

Question No. 27:  If the institution employs (or enters a contract for future employment) with an IAWRP, to work (paid or volunteer) at an institutional camp or clinic prior to adoption of Proposal No. 2016-116 is the institution subject to provisions of IAWRP legislation in football?

Answer:  Pursuant to Proposal No. 2016-116, contracts signed on or after January 18, 2017, for camp or clinic employment after the proposal’s effective date are subject to IAWRP legislation, if the proposal is adopted.